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BIOL 212: Cell Biology

Cell Bio Research @ Collins Library

You can use this guide to get started with your research for your enzyme research paper.  If you get stuck or have any questions, please get in touch with your Science Liaison Librarian, Eli Gandour-Rood

=== check out his contact information ===>

Eli can help you find primary literature, track down relevant articles, or learn how to use a citation management tool like Zotero to create all of your citations.

You can email, call, or set up an appointment (you can choose an in-person appointment or a virtual appointment via Zoom or Google Meet)

Pacific Cod from NOAA, adapted by Eli

Spot the Primary Literature

In your report, you'll need to include citations to studies that support your writing, whether by providing contextual background for your hypothesis, or strengthening your interpretation of your results. You'll mostly be searching for primary literature to cite in your report, but secondary literature such as review articles can be helpful, too! Review articles can be helpful for that background information, and can also be a great source for you to find the relevant primary literature. 

It's helpful to keep in mind the differences between a primary article (presents original research findings; will almost always therefore have a 'methods' and a 'results' section) and a review article (provides an overview of already published research, and no new data; will typically not have a 'methods' or 'results' section; will often have the word "review' in the title of the article or journal). Take a look at the two articles linked below and see if you can quickly determine which is a primary article and which is a review article. 

Get help now!

Ask a Librarian 24/7 service: Anytime, anywhere! This instant messaging reference service lets you chat with a librarian no matter what time it is. Puget Sound librarians can follow up if you leave your email address.

Best for: Questions that can't wait but come up when the library is closed; citation questions; tracking down specific books and articles.